Friday, July 27, 2012

Matched

Bibliographic Information: Condie, Allyson Braithwaite.  (2010).  Matched.  New York: Penguin Audio
ISBN: 978-0-14-242863-4

Plot Summary: Cassia lives in a world where everything is decided, planned, and dictated by an  organization called "The Society." Everything is decided for Cassia, from what she wears, eats, and does everyday to who she marries, or is "matched" to. Cassia, like most people of her community, sees nothing wrong with the way in which things are run, and even accepts her grandfather's eventual and assigned death date at the age of 80.

Cassia has recently reached the age of 17, the age of being matched to her future husband. She attends her ball and learns that she is among the lucky few to be matched to someone in their own town; she is matched to her best friend, Xander. Along with the matching, each person is given a sort of data card that holds further details on the person they have been matched to. When Cassia decides to take another look at Xander's details, even though she knows him, she is surprised to see Xander's face disappear only to be replaced by the face of another young man, Ky. Cassia is suddenly met with so many questions about who really is her "perfect match, doubts about the future, and does not know where to turn. She is told that she can talk to her grandfather about what has happened but is only met with more confusing ideas about whether or not to accept her assigned future.

Soon Cassia is set off in a tailspin of emotions and rebellion in which she must decide to ignore the new face she has accidentally seen or continue a happy, and prescribed, life with Xander.

Critical Evaluation: Poetry, particularly Dylan Thomas' poems, is a recurring motif of rebellion and hope within Matched. Beginning with the poem that Cassia secretly receives from her deathbound grandfather to the poem she receives from Ky upon the hill. The powerful words of poetry are what incite Cassia to pursue the things that feel right, the love that she feels she wants the most. It's the words of Dylan Thomas', "Do Not Go Gentle into that Good Night"  that urge her not to accept the way things are and to struggle to see the world for what it really is. Cassia acknowledges that she has never heard words like those of Thomas but still understands their urgency and their message to not accept "the dying of the light." This poem incites the emotion of fighting till the end, of continuing on even if the ending isn't victorious, of not being stopped by the obstacles ahead, of never laying down in defeat. Cassia and Ky, and even Cassia's grandfather, understand this message and are able to see "The Society's" world for the controlling and sneaky ruling power that it is. Cassia's simple act of even having the poetry, of learning to write, of loving Ky are all acts of rebellion in which Cassia is able to "rage, rage against the dying of the light" as she defies the controlling world she lives in.   

Reader’s Annotation:
Cassie lives a life of acceptance, until an unexpected face forces her to realize that there may be more options in life than ever known before.
 
Information About the Author: Ally Condie is currently a fulltime writer (Condie, 2012). She spends her time writing, managing her websites and blogs, and spending with her husband and children (Condie, 2012). Prior to writing fulltime, she was an English teacher (Condie, 2012). Condie still keeps her licenses current in case she ever has to teach again (Condie, 2012).

She is currently working on the third book, Reached, from her Matched Trilogy
(Condie, 2012). Crossed is the second book in the Matched Trilogy (Condie, 2012). Condie was featured in the YALSA’s 2011 Teens’ Top Ten for her book Matched (Condie, 2012). She has also been featuredin other top literature journals like Kirkus Review and Publisher's  Weekly (Condie, 2012).

The Matched Trilogy Official Site

Genre:
Romance, Science Fiction

Subgenre:
Utopia/Dystopia, Politics  

Curriculum Ties: Could tie into a discussion on future societies and technology.

Booktalking Ideas:

1). Although Cassia world is "perfect" does it offer the perfect life?
2). Why is Cassia so drawn to Ky?
3).  What does it mean to have a "taste of everything and a meal of nothing?"

Reading Level/Interest Age: Lexile Reading Level: 680/ YA (Follett's Titlewave, 2012). Grades 9-12 (Follett Titlewave, 2012).

 
Challenge Issues: No challenge issues seem to exist in this book.

1) Refer to Library Bill of Rights, see items: I, II, and III (http://www.ala.org/advocacy/intfreedom/librarybill).
2) Refer to San Diego Public Library collection policy - (http://www.sandiego.gov/public-library/about-the-library/freedom.shtml).  Original site: The American Library Association (ALA) Freedom to Read/View Statement (http://www.ala.org/offices/oif/statementspols/ftrstatement/freedomreadstatement).
3) Refer to California School Library Association (CSLA), Model School Library Standards - September 2010 (http://www.csla.net/index.php/publications/school-library-standards). PDF: (http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/librarystandards.pdf).
4) Refer t0 American Association for School, Librarians Standards for the 21st Century Learner (http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/guidelinesandstandards/learningstandards/AASL_Learning_Standards_2007.pdf)
5) Contact Office of Intellectual Freedom for any further support, 800-545-2433, ext. 4223 or oif@ala.org.
6) Refer to legitimate book reviews, such as: School Library Journal, Booklist, Kirkus Reviews, Horn Book and others; found on either Academic Search Premier, Follett's TITLEWAVE, or Amazon.com.

Why did you include this book in the titles you selected?:
I included this title because it offers a very interesting perspective of what future life could be like. It also plays with the idea of what life would be like if it was completely designed for each person. Teenagers will be able to understand Cassia's struggle as she is forced to live within the rules or face the serious consequences of not conforming to "The Society's" demands.

Reference Page:
 


Condie, A.  (2012) Author bio. Retrieved July 27, 2012 from http://www.allysoncondie.com/bio/

Follett's Titlewave. Matched.  Retrieved July 27, 2012 from Follett's Titlewave iPhone App.

cover art: sfaudio.com

Thursday, July 26, 2012

The Lost Boy: A Foster Child's Search for the Love of a Family

Bibliographic Information: Pelzer, D.  (1997).  The lost boy: A foster child's search for the love of a family.  Florida: Health Communications.  ISBN: 978-1558745155 

Plot Summary: The Lost Boy... is a retelling of one man's, Dave Pelzer, experience in the foster system from the ages of 12-18. The story begins with a heartwrenching recollection of Pelzer's time beneath his mother's abusive rule and constant maltreatment. Pelzer lives through constant mistreatment, while his father passively attempts to stop his mother, but gives up in order to "keep the peace." It is never quite stated why, but Pelzer's mother hates him beyond reason and makes sure to let Pelzer know every day. The story truly begins when Pelzer is finally taking into custody and made a ward of the court. Pelzer then lives through a couple of different foster homes, never quite feeling at home. Pelzer's situation finally culminates with a serious run in with the law and an eventual change in future plans. Pelzer's journey speaks to a young boy and man searching for a place to call home. 

Critical Evaluation: A reoccurring motif in Pelzer's book, and life, is the stripping and rejection of his identity as a person. Pelzer's abusive mother seems incapable of referring to Pelzer as "David" or "Dave," always referring to him as "The Boy" or "It." She feels it necessary to strip him of his name, or individual identity, in order to justify treating Pelzer as a form of garbage. By removing Pelzer's identity, Pelzer's mother removes any reason to feel sympathy or remorse for her actions. In essense, if Pelzer is not quite a person then she is able to treat him as she would a microwave or vacuum. This refusal to acknowledge Pelzer as a human being creates the distance she needs to play her "games" and terrorize Pelzer. Pelzer, on the other hand, does not begin to regain his identity until he meets a series of loving foster home figures that remind him that he is allowed to feel, enjoy, and run around. Pelzer can be seen always struggling with the reoccurring image of the "It;" the ever persistent feeling that his happiness and new found existence will be taken from him. All in all, Pelzer's tie to his identify (in name, clothing, personal space) marks the difference between being an abandoned teen and becoming a developed man.    

Reader’s Annotation:
One boy's search for love and acceptance takes him on a wild journey that many often do not survive. 
 
Information About the Author: Dave Pelzer grew up being terribly abused by an alcoholic mother (Pelzer, 2012). Pelzer never understood why his mother hated so much but had to endure her wrath in order to survive  (Pelzer, 2012). Pelzer is finally saved at the age of 12 when school figures finally interceded on his behalf (Pelzer, 2012). At the time of discovery, the Pelzer abuse case proved to the the worst in recorded U.S history (Pelzer, 2012). Pelzer then went on to become a ward of the state and experienced a variety of different foster homes (Pelzer, 2012). Pelzer then enlisted in the Air Force where he worked doing midair refuel (Pelzer, 2012). Pelzer went on to receive several medals and commendations for his works from the state of California to the President of the United States (Pelzer, 2012) Pelzer is dedicated to helping others.

Pelzer has also written: A Child Called "It," A Man Names Dave, Help Yourself, The Privilege of Youth, Help Yourself for Teens, Moving Forward (Pelzer: Books, 2012). Pelzer plans on continuing to write books and spread his experiences in order to help others come to terms with their own.



 
A trailer for The Lost Boy...

Genre: Non-fiction, Crossover, Contemporary

Subgenre:
Homelessness and Foster Living Arrangements, Mental Illness
 
Curriculum Ties: Can tie into a section on mental health and relationships.

Booktalking Ideas:

1). Why does Pelzer's mother find it necessary to refer to Pelzer as "The Boy?"
2). Is Pelzer's delinquency a product of his environment?  
3). Does this book give a fair presentation of foster homes?

Reading Level/Interest Age: Lexile Reading Level: 720/AD (Follett's Titlewave, 2012). 

Adult to YA crossover (bookbrowse.com, 2012). 

Challenge Issues: This book includes violence, abuse, and some crime. I would use the following items if this book was ever challenged:

1) Refer to Library Bill of Rights, see items: I, II, and III (http://www.ala.org/advocacy/intfreedom/librarybill).
2) Refer to San Diego Public Library collection policy - (http://www.sandiego.gov/public-library/about-the-library/freedom.shtml).  Original site: The American Library Association (ALA) Freedom to Read/View Statement (http://www.ala.org/offices/oif/statementspols/ftrstatement/freedomreadstatement).
3) Refer to California School Library Association (CSLA), Model School Library Standards - September 2010 (http://www.csla.net/index.php/publications/school-library-standards). PDF: (http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/librarystandards.pdf).
4) Refer t0 American Association for School, Librarians Standards for the 21st Century Learner (http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/guidelinesandstandards/learningstandards/AASL_Learning_Standards_2007.pdf)
5) Contact Office of Intellectual Freedom for any further support, 800-545-2433, ext. 4223 or oif@ala.org.
6) Refer to legitimate book reviews, such as: School Library Journal, Booklist, Kirkus Reviews, Horn Book and others; found on either Academic Search Premier, Follett's TITLEWAVE, or Amazon.com.

Why did you include this book in the titles you selected?:
In The Lost Boy... Pelzer closely examines his own life experiences with both verbal and mental abuse. These experiences are important to share with teens because it helps them differentiate between healthy and toxic relationships. This type of controversial literature allows teens to understand complex topics without directly experiencing them.

Reference Page:


bookbrowse.com.  (2012).  Adult to YA crossovers: The lost boy... Retrieved August 3, 2012 from  http://www.bookbrowse.com/browse/index.cfm?fuseaction=books category_number=128&start_id=153&order=p

Follett's Titlewave.  (2012). The lost boy... Retrieved August 3, 2012 from Follett's Titlewave iPhone app.

Pelzer, D.  (2012).  About. Retrieved August 4, 2012 from http://www.davepelzer.com/about.html

Pelser, D.  (2012).  Books.  Retrieved August 4, 2012 from http://www.davepelzer.com/books.html

cover art: http://www.betterworldbooks.com/the-lost-boy-id-1558745157.aspx

My Sister's Keeper

Bibliographic Information: Picoult, J. My sister's keeper. New York: Atria Books.  ISBN: 978-0743454537

Plot Summary: Thirteen year old Anna loves her older sister, Kate, but has never known a life in which Kate's needs did not rule her every move and breathing moment. Kate has had leukemia since a young age and relies on Anna, a child born as an exact bone marrow match, to supplement her health with healthy bone marrow, blood transfusions, and a variety of other operations and tests. Anna has never had a problem, until she reaches the age of thirteen and decides to sue her family for her medical emancipation. 


Anna's decisions throws her family into a panicked disorder pitting mom against daughter. It is not until the truth comes out about why Anna is demanding her medical emancipation that her family begins to understand why she refuses to back down. In the midst of the court chaos, an unimaginable twist of fate teaches Anna's family that sometimes the things that blindside us the most are the things we never see coming.  

Critical Evaluation: *SPOILER ALERT*

Picoult employs the use of irony in this book in a way the leaves readers enraged. The entire story seems to revolve around the uncertain future of the older sister, Kate, making it appear that her life is only moments from possibly ending. Picoult builds the story, adds drama, and emotion as a family struggles to deal with the possible loss of Kate who they have worked so hard to keep alive. The loss is only further magnified by the resistance Anna shows in continuing to participate in keeping Kate alive. It all seems like it's going to end with Kate's eventual death; an ending the makes sense given the hard struggle that has been keeping Kate alive. The court's ruling in favor of Anna's health emancipation seems only to seal Kate's fate. The reader is only given what feels like seconds to adjust to the cold hard truth that Kate's life is over when Anna has her tragic accident, changing Kate's life forever. Picoult employs this ironic twist of fate without apology, forcing the reader to deal with the fact that life is often so uncertain that endings come nearly out of nowhere. This ironic twist also forces the reader to reexamine the ever changing course of life.


Reader’s Annotation:
A sister's love is one of the most powerful things in the world. Anna is forced to decide whether or not she is willing to give up her life for her sister's.
 
Information About the Author: Picoult was born in 1966 in New York on Long Island (Picoult FAQ, 2012). She's always dreamed of being a writer and being able to provide for her family (Picoult FAQ, 2012). She studied creative writing at Princeton University (Picoult FAQ, 2012). Alice Hoffman is one of her idols and finds the following three works to be her favorite: Gone With the Wind, The Great Gatsby, and The Sun Also Rises (Picoult FAQ, 2012).

Picoult has also written (information pulled directly from jodiepicoult.com): Songs of the Humpback Whale (1992), Harvesting the Heart (1994), Picture Perfect (1995), Mercy (1996), The Pact (1998), Keeping Faith (1999), Plain Truth (2000), Salem Falls (2001), Perfect Match (2002), Second Glance (2003), My Sister's Keeper(2004), Vanishing Acts (2005), The Tenth Circle (2006) Nineteen Minutes (2007), Change of Heart (2008), Handle With Care (2009), House Rules (2010), and SING YOU HOME (2011), and LONE WOLF  (Picoult Books, 2012).


My Sister's Keeper Website

Genre:
Contemporary

Subgenre:
Death and Deadly Disease, Personal Convictions
 
Curriculum Ties: Can tie into a lesson on cancer and how it affects families and communities.

Booktalking Ideas:

1). Is Anna and Kate's mom, Sara, the villain in this story?
2). Is Anna correct to ask for her medical emancipation?
3). Was it morally correct to subject Anna to so many medical tests for Kate?

Reading Level/Interest Age: Adult to YA crossover (browsebook.com, 2012)

Challenge Issues: This book deals with death and illness and may be considered to serious for teens. I will defend it with the following items:

1) Refer to Library Bill of Rights, see items: I, II, and III (http://www.ala.org/advocacy/intfreedom/librarybill).
2) Refer to San Diego Public Library collection policy - (http://www.sandiego.gov/public-library/about-the-library/freedom.shtml).  Original site: The American Library Association (ALA) Freedom to Read/View Statement (http://www.ala.org/offices/oif/statementspols/ftrstatement/freedomreadstatement).
3) Refer to California School Library Association (CSLA), Model School Library Standards - September 2010 (http://www.csla.net/index.php/publications/school-library-standards). PDF: (http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/librarystandards.pdf).
4) Refer t0 American Association for School, Librarians Standards for the 21st Century Learner (http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/guidelinesandstandards/learningstandards/AASL_Learning_Standards_2007.pdf)
5) Contact Office of Intellectual Freedom for any further support, 800-545-2433, ext. 4223 or oif@ala.org.
6) Refer to legitimate book reviews, such as: School Library Journal, Booklist, Kirkus Reviews, Horn Book and others; found on either Academic Search Premier, Follett's TITLEWAVE, or Amazon.com.

Why did you include this book in the titles you selected?:
This book deals with very important subjects like cancer and death. These issues are very important and prominent in many teens lives who are dealing with the illness, or even death, of loved ones. This book details the all too possible way in which families are forced to deal with sicknesses like cancer.

Reference Page:


browsebook.com.  (2012).  My sister's keeper: Adult to YA.  Retrieved July 26, 2012 from http://www.bookbrowse.com/
browse/index.cfm?fuseaction=
books&category_number=128&start_id=97&order=p

Follett's Titlewave.  (2012).  My sister's keeper.  Retrieved July 26, 2012 from Follett's Titlewave iPhone app. 

Picoult, J.  (2012).  Books.  Retrieved July 26, 2012 from http://jodipicoult.com/jodi-picoult-books.html

Picoult, J.  (2012).  FAQs: Jodi answers 10 terrifying questions. Retrieved July 26, 2012 from http://jodipicoult.com/faqs-booktopia.html

cover art: http://jodipicoult.com/my-sisters-keeper.html

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Boy Meets Boy

Bibliographic Information: Levithan, D.  (2003).  Boy Meets Boy.  New York: Alfred A. Knopf
ISBN: 978-0375832994

Plot Summary: Paul, a gay high school sophomore, lives in a world where he is loved and accepted for who he is. Paul spends his days hanging out with his best friend, Joni, dealing with school drama, and trying to understand his past relationships. Paul recognizes his luck as he spends time with his friend, Tony, who is also gay and comes from a strict religious family. Tony, unlike Paul, must hide who he is and exists on the fringes of Paul's reality.

Paul's world suddenly changes when Noah, a new boy at school, unexpectedly comes into his life and challenges the way in which he views love and being in a relationship. Paul must learn to recognize what he wants, while paving the way for his friend Tony who is also struggling to come into his own.

This novel offers a complex story of being true to one's own feelings, finding what is right amidst the chaos, and really appreciating what one has before it is gone.


Critical Evaluation: Levithan creates an almost magical world in Boy Meets Boy by emphasizing the whimsical nature of the novel's setting. From the way in which Noah's room is arranged to the "Death Ball" that the students put on for the school, the entire world of Boy Meets Boy vibrates with an uncommon air of acceptance, whimsy, and congruency. Every detail that Levithan chooses to describe Paul's world, from Infinite Darlene to Tony's slowly accepting parents, paints the picture of a world that is far more socially developed than the present world we exist in. In Paul's world no one questions that the quarterback is a crossdressing student who plays football and sashays through school in miniskirts, no one questions Paul's romantic indecisions and conflicting feelings when he is met by the decision of having two boys he may love, and absolutely no one questions the fact that Paul loves boys at all. Levithan uses the setting and its characters to send out a powerful message of love, inclusion, and how things could be if people were accepted as simply being who they are and who they wish to be.

Reader’s Annotation:
Paul, an openly gay teen, must learn how to make things right after several relationship blunders that may dictate the rest of his high school experience.
 
Information About the Author: David Levithan does not enjoy writing biographies about himself and has disclosed little to no information about his life (Levithan, 2012). . Besides the following facts;  Levithan was born in 1972, graduated from Brown in 1994, and published his first book in 2003, Boy Meets Boy (Levithan, 2012). Levithan, though, does love to talk about his book and shares much details about why he wrote certain books, including Boy Meets Boy (Levithan, 2012)

Levithan began Boy Meets Boy as a Valentine's story for his friend
(Levithan, 2012). It then developed far beyond that, becoming a book he would wish to read (Levithan, 2012). Levithan wanted Boy Meets Boy to be be about characters that do not deal with the usual challenges of being outcasted, bullying, or being related to someone who is gay (Levithan, 2012). Levithan wanted to create a story of hope, an expectation of how the world should be and where we should be in terms of LGBT acceptance (Levithan, 2012).

Levithan has also written:
The Realm of Possibility (2004), Are We There Yet (2005), Wide Awake (2006), Love is the Higher Law (2009), Will Grayson, Will Grayson with John Green (2010), and many other books (Levithan, 2012).

Genre:
Romance,
Contemporary

Subgenre: Humorous Romance, Sexual Identity


Curriculum Ties: Can tie into a discussion on LGBT rights, bullying and community presence.

Booktalking Ideas:
 

1). Why do all of Paul's friends tell him that he's so lucky to be himself?
2). What does Tony's experience show about community support of individuality and sexuality?

Reading Level/Interest Age: Lexile Reading Level 730/YA (Follett's Titlewave, 2012)

Challenge Issues: This book contains LGBT themes and characters. I would use the following items to defend this book if it was challenged:

1) Refer to Library Bill of Rights, see items: I, II, and III (http://www.ala.org/advocacy/intfreedom/librarybill).
2) Refer to San Diego Public Library collection policy - (http://www.sandiego.gov/public-library/about-the-library/freedom.shtml).  Original site: The American Library Association (ALA) Freedom to Read/View Statement (http://www.ala.org/offices/oif/statementspols/ftrstatement/freedomreadstatement).
3) Refer to California School Library Association (CSLA), Model School Library Standards - September 2010 (http://www.csla.net/index.php/publications/school-library-standards). PDF: (http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/librarystandards.pdf).
4) Refer t0 American Association for School, Librarians Standards for the 21st Century Learner (http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/guidelinesandstandards/learningstandards/AASL_Learning_Standards_2007.pdf)
5) Contact Office of Intellectual Freedom for any further support, 800-545-2433, ext. 4223 or oif@ala.org.
6) Refer to legitimate book reviews, such as: School Library Journal, Booklist, Kirkus Reviews, Horn Book and others; found on either Academic Search Premier, Follett's TITLEWAVE, or Amazon.com.

Why did you include this book in the titles you selected?:
This book deals with themes of LGBT teen relationships which are very important to for teens who may be unsure or may need further support exploring their sexuality. I included this book as a positive example of teens who are working to understand their identities and the way in which they explore their love and affection for others, same sex or otherwise.

Reference Page:

Follett's Titlewave.  (2012).  Boy meets boy.  Retrieved July 26, 2012 from Follet's Titlewave iPhone App.

Levithan, D.  (2012).  About David Levithan.  Retrieved July 26, 2012 from http://www.davidlevithan.com/about_davidlevithan.html

cover art: http://jodysparks.com/tag/boy-meets-boy/

Monday, July 23, 2012

The Lovely Bones

Bibliographic Information: Sebold, A.  (2002).  The lovely bones.  Boston: Little, Brown and Company
ISBN:

Plot Summary:

My name is Salmon, like the fish; first name, Susie. I was fourteen when I was murdered on December 6, 1973.


Susie Salmon is like any other ordinary 14 year old girl with crushes, younger siblings, parents she loves, and so much to live for. One day she decides to walk home through and old corn field, only to be abducted, brutally raped, and murdered by a psychotic neighbor.

Susie Salmon's story is told from her perspective, between heaven and earth, as she watches her family fall apart. Susie inter-splices her observations of her grief stricken father, her distant mother, and lost siblings, with flashbacks to memories, and to also share the beauty of the heaven she partially exists in. Susie must learn to let go of her family and all that ties her to the earth in order to finally be completely part of heaven.

Critical Evaluation: 

These were the lovely bones that had grown around my absence: the connections- sometimes tenuous, sometimes made at great cost, but often magnificent- that happened after I was gone. And I began to see things in a way that let me hold the world without me in it. The events that my death wrought were merely bones of a body that would become whole at some unpredictable time in the future. The price of what I came to see as this miraculous body had been in my life.

-Alice Sebold, (Pg. 320)


Alice Sebold takes the title of her book from this passage. She builds a metaphor around  Susie's literal scattered bones to represent the things that come of the shards of life, the "lovely bones" that accumulate from what has passed, and grow to become a whole new being of hope and even happiness. The "lovely bones that had grown" represent the bone fragments that have knitted together in Susie's absence, the pieces that shattered apart upon her death, and have slowly mended together with time. Out of the space that was Susie's life, her family has been forced to rebuild again; and even though her family fought the movement of time, it was eventual and unrelenting.  Susie's father, her mother, even her siblings had no other choice but to move forward and from that movement has sprung forward "the lovely bones," small fragile bones that grew out of the barrenness of Susie's death. Susie recognizes the profound message that remains at the end of her tale, of a family so shattered that it has no other option but to come back together painfully, but lovingly. What begins again, "the lovely bones" that have risen are the result of the beauty that rises from the dark and sad.

Reader’s Annotation:
Caught between heaven and earth, 14 year old Susie Salmon tells that tale of her chilling demise as she watches over her crumbling family.  

Information About the Author: Alice Sebold was born September 6, 1963 in Madison, Wisconsin (biography.com, 2012). Her early life was difficult and was greatly influenced by an alcoholic mother that was often crippled under bouts of panic and anxiety (biography.com, 2012). Unfortuantely, Sebold's life only became more difficult when she was brutally raped in a tunnel at Syracuse University (biography.com, 2012). This influenced Sebold's life greatly, causing her fear and anxiety throughout the years (biography.com, 2012). She later graduated and attempted to pursue a graduate program in Texas (biography.com, 2012). Sebold was unable to finish this program due to a heroin addiction (biography.com, 2012). She later moved to New York City where she worked a variety of odd jobs (biography.com, 2012).

Sebold later moved to California and matriculated in a graduate program at University of California, Irivine (biography.com, 2012). It was during this time that she wrote her first book, Lucky (the police to her she was "lucky" to survive her attack since another girl was similarly attacked and murdered) (biography.com, 2012). She later wrote The Lovely Bones which was later turned into a movie (biography.com, 2012).

Sebold currently lives in San Francisco, CA with her husband (biography.com, 2012). 




The Lovely Bones movie trailer
 
Genre:
Fantasy, Mystery, Horror, and Suspense, Contemporary, Crossover 


Subgenre: Psychopaths, Death and Deadly Disease, Alternate and Parallel Worlds 

Curriculum Ties: Can tie into a discussion on the afterlife.

Booktalking Ideas:
 

1). What is keeping Susie rooted to earth?
2). Why do Susie's parents become distant with each other?

Reading Level/Interest Age:Lexile Reading Level: 890/Adult (Follett's Titlewave, 2012)
Adult Crossover to YA (bookbrowse.com, 2012)

Challenge Issues: This book portrays the harsh subjects of murder, rape, and family instability. I would use the following items to defend it:

1) Refer to Library Bill of Rights, see items: I, II, and III (http://www.ala.org/advocacy/intfreedom/librarybill).
2) Refer to San Diego Public Library collection policy - (http://www.sandiego.gov/public-library/about-the-library/freedom.shtml).  Original site: The American Library Association (ALA) Freedom to Read/View Statement (http://www.ala.org/offices/oif/statementspols/ftrstatement/freedomreadstatement).
3) Refer to California School Library Association (CSLA), Model School Library Standards - September 2010 (http://www.csla.net/index.php/publications/school-library-standards). PDF: (http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/librarystandards.pdf).
4) Refer t0 American Association for School, Librarians Standards for the 21st Century Learner (http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/guidelinesandstandards/learningstandards/AASL_Learning_Standards_2007.pdf)
5) Contact Office of Intellectual Freedom for any further support, 800-545-2433, ext. 4223 or oif@ala.org.
6) Refer to legitimate book reviews, such as: School Library Journal, Booklist, Kirkus Reviews, Horn Book and others; found on either Academic Search Premier, Follett's TITLEWAVE, or Amazon.com.

Why did you include this book in the titles you selected?:
This book has very intense subject matter (murder and rape), but includes some of the most beautiful prose and imagery available in a modern book. Teens will be able to identify with Susie Salmon as she attempts to watch over her family and deals with questions of death, life, and heaven. I picked this book because of its very vivid main character who even in death is able to relate with the every day problems of a teen and her family.

Reference Page:


biography.com.  (2012).  Alice Sebold biography.  Retrieved July 24, 2012 from http://www.biography.com/people/alice-sebold-20702765?page=1

bookbrowse.com  (2012).  YA to adult crossover.  Retrived July 24, 2012 from http://www.bookbrowse.com/
browse/index.cfm?fuseaction=books&category_number=128&start_id=113&order=p 

Follett's Titlewave.  (2012).  The lovely bones.  Retrieved July, 24 2012 from Follett's Titlewave iPhone app.

Saturday, July 21, 2012

Journey 2: The Mysterious Island

Bibliographic Information: Flynn, B. [Producer], & Peyton, B. [Director].  (2012).  Journey 2: The mysterious island [Motion Picture].  USA: New Line Cinema. 

Plot Summary: 17 year old Sean Anderson has a new step-father, Hank, who he refers to as "legal guardian." Sean is not happy about the new addition to his family and is constantly acting out. The movie opens with Sean fleeing on a motorcycle in a high speed chase as numerous cop cars attempt to catch him. In a last ditch effort to run away, Sean flies over a play structure and into a backyard pool. Sean's stepfather, who seems to have connections with the local police, is called in and takes Sean home. 

When back at home, in an effort to try to bond with Sean, Hank visits Sean in his room and tries getting him to open up about what's going on in his life. Sean makes obvious efforts to not talk to Hank and continues working on a project at his desk. Hank leans in to take a look and notices that it's an encoded message. Sean then tells Hank that he is sure the message is from his grandfather who may be stranded on a mythical island. With Hank's help, Sean soon cracks the message sending him into a traveling frenzy. Realizing the perfect opportunity to bond with his stepson, Hank buys them both tickets to find the island together.

Soon, Sean and Hank set off to the nearest island to the mythical island meeting Gabato and Kailani who attempt to take them to their desired location in a helicopter. Soon they are sucked down into a category 5 tornado, where their true adventure begins. 






Journey 2: The Mysterious Island
trailer

Critical Evaluation: N/A

Reader’s Annotation: An unscrambled message sets, Sean Anderson and his stepfather, Hank, on an adventure to save his grandfather that may be stranded on a mythical island.
 
Information About the Director: Brad Peyton was born in Gander, Newfoundland and Labrador (tribute, 2012). He first received recognition for his short Evelyn: The Cutest Evil Dead Girl in 2002 (tribute, 2012). Peyton has also directed: Journey to the Center of the Earth (2008) and Cats & Dogs: Revenge of Kitty Galore (2010) (tribute, 2012).

Genre:
Adventure, Action, Comedy, Fantasy

 
Curriculum Ties: Can tie into a lesson about Jules Verne's Journey

Booktalking Ideas:

1). Does Hank's effort to get closer to his stepson work?
2). What influence does Jules Vere's book The Mysterious Island have on this movie?

Reading Level/Interest Age: 13+

Challenge Issues: This movie contains some elements of high intensity action. I would use the following items to defend this movie if it was challenged:

1) Refer to Library Bill of Rights, see items: I, II, and III (http://www.ala.org/advocacy/intfreedom/librarybill).
2) Refer to San Diego Public Library collection policy - (http://www.sandiego.gov/public-library/about-the-library/freedom.shtml).  Original site: The American Library Association (ALA) Freedom to Read/View Statement (http://www.ala.org/offices/oif/statementspols/ftrstatement/freedomreadstatement).
3) Refer to California School Library Association (CSLA), Model School Library Standards - September 2010 (http://www.csla.net/index.php/publications/school-library-standards). PDF: (http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/librarystandards.pdf).
4) Refer t0 American Association for School, Librarians Standards for the 21st Century Learner (http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/guidelinesandstandards/learningstandards/AASL_Learning_Standards_2007.pdf)
5) Contact Office of Intellectual Freedom for any further support, 800-545-2433, ext. 4223 or oif@ala.org.
6) Refer to legitimate book reviews, such as: School Library Journal, Booklist, Kirkus Reviews, Horn Book and others; found on either Academic Search Premier, Follett's TITLEWAVE, or Amazon.com.

Why did you include this movie in the titles you selected?:
I selected this movie because its main protagonist, Sean Anderson, is adventurous teen who isn't afraid of the unknown. Many teenagers can relate to Sean's need for rebellion, individuality, and adventure as he tries to accept and understand his mother's new marriage to Hank. This movie has a lot of action and adventure that will interest students with great imaginations and curiosity. 

Reference Page:


tribute.ca.  (2012).  Brad Peyton biography.  Retrieved July 21, 2012 from http://www.tribute.ca/people/brad-peyton/32859/


cover art:
http://iamquirah.wordpress.com/2012/02/04/journey-2-the-mysterious-island/

Brothers

Bibliographic Information: Auerbach, D., & Carney, P.  (2010).  Brothers [Audio CD]. The Black Keys & Neil, M.  Alabama: Muscled Shoals Sound Studio 

Plot Summary: Brothers is heavily driven by themes of love, heartbreak, and finding the right person. Each track tells a different story that is accompanied by guitar rifts and a deep blues inspired singing voice.

Critical Evaluation: A recurring motif in this album is the presence of "the girl," or the unattainable object love. Many songs are centered around this image of this "girl' that either spurns, entrances, lifts up, or breaks down those that love her. This can be seen in songs like Everlasting Light, Next Girl, Howling for You, Tighten Up, and Never Gonna to Give You Up (to name a few).

This reoccurring motif of love as both a destructive and thrilling force is only further emphasized by the blues-rock infusions that are threaded throughout every track. Not only do the lyrics reflect the subject's complex feelings towards love and everything connected to it, but also the blues infused rhythms that drip a mixture of deep sadness and reflection. Overall, the topic of love, or "the girl," is a complex component of life that is carefully carved into many songs on the Brothers album.  




Tighten Up
by The Black Keys

Reader’s Annotation: This album tells love stories that are framed by blues influences and rocking guitar rifts. 
 
Information About the Band: The Black Keys is made up of two members, Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney (Amazon, 2012). Both grew up in Akron, Ohio and joined together in 2002 to release their debut album, The Big Come Up (Amazon, 2012). The Black Keys have recorded most of their albums in Alabama at the Muscle Shoals Studio (Amazon, 2012). Auerbach and Carney named their album Brothers to represent their solidarity through the good and bad times they have experienced together which have only made their duo stronger (Amazon, 2012).

Some other records by The Black Keys: Thickfreakness (2002),  Rubber Factory (2004), Chulahoma (2006), Attack and Release (2008), and El Camino (2011)
(Amazon, 2012).

Genre:
Alternative, Blues-Rock 


Curriculum Ties: Could be used in a section on music appreciation and history.

Booktalking Ideas:

1). What does this album show about the relationship between blues and rocks?
2). How's does blues handle the theme of love?

Reading Level/Interest Age: 15+

Challenge Issues: Some mature themes such as sex and relationships. I would use the following items to defend this CD if it was challenged:

1) Refer to Library Bill of Rights, see items: I, II, and III (http://www.ala.org/advocacy/intfreedom/librarybill).
2) Refer to San Diego Public Library collection policy - (http://www.sandiego.gov/public-library/about-the-library/freedom.shtml).  Original site: The American Library Association (ALA) Freedom to Read/View Statement (http://www.ala.org/offices/oif/statementspols/ftrstatement/freedomreadstatement).
3) Refer to California School Library Association (CSLA), Model School Library Standards - September 2010 (http://www.csla.net/index.php/publications/school-library-standards). PDF: (http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/librarystandards.pdf).
4) Refer t0 American Association for School, Librarians Standards for the 21st Century Learner (http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/guidelinesandstandards/learningstandards/AASL_Learning_Standards_2007.pdf)
5) Contact Office of Intellectual Freedom for any further support, 800-545-2433, ext. 4223 or oif@ala.org.
6) Refer to legitimate book reviews, such as: School Library Journal, Booklist, Kirkus Reviews, Horn Book and others; found on either Academic Search Premier, Follett's TITLEWAVE, or Amazon.com.

Why did you include this CD in the titles you selected?:
I included this CD in my collection because it offers students a different style of music. This band is currently very popular with the teen scene due to its alternative rock feel and lyrics.

Reference Page:

 
amazon.com.  (2012).  The black keys.  Retrieved July 21, 2012 from http://www.amazon.com/The-Black-Keys/e/B000APP11I/ref=ac_dpt_sa_bio


The Black  Keys.  (2010).  The black keys cover art.  Retrieved July 21, 2012 http://theblackkeysfanlounge.com/2010/02/brothers-the-black-keys-new-album-out-may-18-2010/

Freaky Friday

Bibliographic Information: Gunn, A. [Producer], & Waters, M. [Director].  (2003).  Freaky friday [Motion Picture]. USA: Walt Disney Pictures.

Plot Summary: Dr. Anna Coleman and her 15 year old daughter, Tess, are constantly butting heads and can't seem to agree on any subject. Anna is forever miffed by her daughter's rebellious style and irritating rock band aspirations, while Tess can't understand why her mother needs to act so stuffy and remarry. One night they go out to Chinese food and end up in another uproarious argument. Overhearing their squabble, the restaurant host sneaks them magical fortune cookies. Soon after breaking into the cookies an earthquake is felt, foreshadowing disruptive events to come.

The next day both Anna and Tess wake up shockingly discovering that they have switched bodies. This sets off a series of comedic events that force both Anna and Tess to understand a little bit more about why they are the people that they are. This twist of events finally engenders some understanding between the two fighting groups.

Critical Evaluation: The theme of Freaky Friday is one of changing views in order to understand other people better. This theme manifests in Freaky Friday as the characters literally change bodies. This forces them to deal with each other's problems and everyday dilemmas like never before. This essentially forces them to change their views of each other and to be more sensitive about what each has to deal with. The fortune cookie triggering their physical change is not in itself enough for them to change their views, but seeing the world through each other's eyes is really what makes the difference.

This theme is a very important when it comes to teens and their parents. Often time teens are not able to understand why their parents do what they do. Similarly, parents frequently do not understand their teens. These kinds of misunderstandings make being close very difficult. The only solution often is to try to understand each other a little bit better, to change their point of view of each other's lives, and to not make assumptions. For Anna and Tess, the fortune cookie makes this possible.  




Freaky Friday
trailer

 Reader’s Annotation: One little fortune cookies forces mother and daughter to understand each other a little bit more as they frantically learn to walk in each other's shoes.
 
Information About the Director: Mark Waters was born June 30, 1964 in South Bend, Indiana (Tribute, 2012). He attended the University of Pennsylvania and spent time studying theater (Tribute, 2012). Waters graduated in 1986 and soon after moved to San Francisco (Tribute, 2012). Waters' first movie success was House of Yes in 1997 (Tribute, 2012).

Some other films by Waters: Head over heels (2001), Freaky Friday (2003), Just Like Heaven (2005), 
Ghosts of Girlfriends Past (2009) (Tribute, 2012). Waters received the Franklin J. Schaffner Award by the American Film Institute (Tribute, 2012).
Genre:
Science Fiction,
Comedy

Curriculum Ties: Ties into a lesson on inter-generational relationships.

Booktalking Ideas:
 

1). Does switching bodies give Anna and Tess a better sense of each other's points of view?
2). What kind of magical do the fortune cookies bring to the story?

3). Do Anna and Tess have a typical relationship?

Reading Level/Interest Age: 15+

Challenge Issues: No challenge issues. If any issues arise I will use the following materials to defend this item:

1) Refer to Library Bill of Rights, see items: I, II, and III (http://www.ala.org/advocacy/intfreedom/librarybill).
2) Refer to San Diego Public Library collection policy - (http://www.sandiego.gov/public-library/about-the-library/freedom.shtml).  Original site: The American Library Association (ALA) Freedom to Read/View Statement (http://www.ala.org/offices/oif/statementspols/ftrstatement/freedomreadstatement).
3) Refer to California School Library Association (CSLA), Model School Library Standards - September 2010 (http://www.csla.net/index.php/publications/school-library-standards). PDF: (http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/librarystandards.pdf).
4) Refer t0 American Association for School, Librarians Standards for the 21st Century Learner (http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/guidelinesandstandards/learningstandards/AASL_Learning_Standards_2007.pdf)
5) Contact Office of Intellectual Freedom for any further support, 800-545-2433, ext. 4223 or oif@ala.org.
6) Refer to legitimate book reviews, such as: School Library Journal, Booklist, Kirkus Reviews, Horn Book and others; found on either Academic Search Premier, Follett's TITLEWAVE, or Amazon.com.

Why did you include this movie in the titles you selected?:
I included this item in my collection because it highlights important elements of relationship building between teens and their parents. Although this movie does have a science fiction component, it still reflects some of the issues that the modern day teen faces when trying to reach out to their parents (and vice versa).

Reference Page:

 
tribute.ca.  (2012).  Mark Waters biography.  Retrieved July 15, 2012 from http://www.tribute.ca/people/mark-waters/4122/

cover art:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freaky_Friday_%282003_film%29

eBook & Audiobooks (EBSCOhost)

Bibliographic Information: eBooks &  audiobooks (EBSCOhost).  http://ebscohost.com/ebooks. EBSCOhost

Plot Summary: eBooks & Audiobooks, a component of the subscription database services EBSCOhost, offers a wide selection of downloadable digital ebooks and audiobooks. This tool, paired with the other EBSCOhost products, offers
researchers, students, and a variety of other users complex search results and a full spectrum of resources.

Critical Evaluation: N/A

Reader’s Annotation:
eBook & Audiobooks by EBSCOhost offer ebooks and audiobooks downloads that perfectly accent the wide variety of EBSCOhost database search results.
 
Information About the Database: EBooks & Audio books is a component of EBSCOhost (EBSCOhost, 2012). The EBSCOhost platform offers a variety of services including: DynaMEd, H.W. Wilson, Digital Archives, and many more services (EBSCOhost, 2012). Receiving more than 100 million daily page views, EBSCohost is an excellent resouce for a multitute of schools, libraries, universities, researchers and a variety of other users (EBSCOhost, 2012).  EBSCOhost offers top notch data in a variety of different fields and prides itself in offering premium content to a wide user base (EBSCOhost, 2012).

Genre:
Database


Curriculum Ties: Ties into lessons on better research practices.

Booktalking Ideas:
N/A

Reading Level/Interest Age: 15+

Challenge Issues: No challenge issues.

1) Refer to Library Bill of Rights, see items: I, II, and III (http://www.ala.org/advocacy/intfreedom/librarybill).
2) Refer to San Diego Public Library collection policy - (http://www.sandiego.gov/public-library/about-the-library/freedom.shtml).  Original site: The American Library Association (ALA) Freedom to Read/View Statement (http://www.ala.org/offices/oif/statementspols/ftrstatement/freedomreadstatement).
3) Refer to California School Library Association (CSLA), Model School Library Standards - September 2010 (http://www.csla.net/index.php/publications/school-library-standards). PDF: (http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/librarystandards.pdf).
4) Refer t0 American Association for School, Librarians Standards for the 21st Century Learner (http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/guidelinesandstandards/learningstandards/AASL_Learning_Standards_2007.pdf)
5) Contact Office of Intellectual Freedom for any further support, 800-545-2433, ext. 4223 or oif@ala.org.
6) Refer to legitimate book reviews, such as: School Library Journal, Booklist, Kirkus Reviews, Horn Book and others; found on either Academic Search Premier, Follett's TITLEWAVE, or Amazon.com.

Why did you include this book in the titles you selected?:
This database component offers students a wide variety of supplementary resources; such as ebooks and audiobooks. This subscription based service will give students the opportunity to increase the value of their research results by giving them a more complete view of available resources.

Reference Page:

 
EBSCOhost.  (2012).  About us.  Retrieved July 21, 2012 from http://www.ebscohost.com/ebooks

The Book Thief

Bibliographic Information: Zusak, M.  (2007).  The book thief. USA: Knopf. ISBN: 978-0-375-84220-7

Plot Summary: Set in Nazi Germany, The Book Thief tells the story of a young girl, Liesel Meminger, through the narration of Death who accidentally finds her diary. Liesel, the daughter of communist sympathizers, is sent to Molching, Germany, in order to be distanced from her parents' dangerous reputation. On the way to Molching, Liesel's brother dies suddenly of a fatal cough. Even though Liesel does not read, this event sets Liesel's book thievery into motion as she steals the grave digger's book, The Grave Digger's Handbook, as a memento of her young brother's funeral and untimely death.

Upon arriving in Molching, and being forced to leave her mother, Liesel is introduced to her new foster parents, Hans and Rosa Hubermann. Liesels' transition into Himmel Street (which means "Heaven Street" in German) is a rough one as Liesel deals with nightmares and sorrowful memories of both her dead brother and mother. Soon Liesel forms a bond with Hans, her foster father, who spends sleepless nights with her helping her deal with her nightmares. Soon Hans is teaching her to read and write, feeding Liesel's love for words that is so closely rooted to the absence of her mother and father. Liesel is also enveloped by Rosa, her foster mother, even though Rosa's love is much coarser than that of Hans.

Nazi sentiment continues to increase as Liesel finds her place in her new home. To pass the time Liesel makes friends with Ruddy, a nearby neighbor, who randomly helps Liesel with her thievery. It is not long before the Nazi conflict comes close to home as Hans makes the difficult decision to hide Max Vandenburg, a Jew, in his basement. This decision sets off a series of events that forever changes the lives of Liesel, Hans, and Rosa on their beloved Himmel Street.


Critical Evaluation: Words and language play a significant part in The Book Thief. For Liesel Meminger words become the only memento she has of her mother and brother. An evident truth as she holds on to The Grave Digger's Manual, a book that she is unable to read in the beginning but struggles to learn to read over time with Hans Hubbermann, her foster father. Every time she reads this book, and any book thereafter, she becomes closer to the memory of those she has lost. She then uses this comfort to comfort others in times of distress. Words become a conduit of memory, love, and most of all, a sort of resilience that keeps Liesel together in the most difficult of times. Liesel is even able to understand that she is not the only one that understands the power of words as she witnesses the cruelty that is only made possible by Hitler's rhetoric. 


Liesel has a dual vision of the world around her as she realizes that words are not just a positive thing, but can also be used to wreak terrible havoc. Liesel understands the dangerous side of words as she witnesses Hitler use the words to his advantage as he spews the hate that changes a whole nation. Liesel only understands this more, as she witnesses Max Vandenburg struggle against the guilt of being the only survivor and of having left his family behind. Liesel understands that Hitler's words have poisoned many around her and changed them into heartless monsters. These factors make words even more important to Liesel as she is surrounded by the love of Hans, Rosa, and Max who all encourage her to continue using the words to help those around her. 

Words in the end symbolize a powerful force of change and influence that can be used in so many ways, for joy and hate, for hope and despair. 

Reader’s Annotation:
Liesel Meminger finds power and strength through words as she comforts others through the conflict of Nazi Germany, the Holocaut, and World War II.


Information About the Author: Markus Zusak was born in Sidney, Australia in 1975 where he currently resides with his wife and daughter (Grade Saver, 2012). Zusak found the inspiration to write The Book Thief  from stories her heard from stories he hear from his mother and father who both experienced World War II (Random House, 2012). Zusak intended to write a short novella, but found the subject matter so important that he ended up with a 500+ page story. Zusak cites The Old Man and the Sea, The Outsiders, and What's Eating Gilbert Grape as influencing him as a boy to become a writer (Random House, 2012). 

Some of Zusak's other works include: The Underdog (1999), Fighting Ruben Wolfe (2001), When Dogs Cry (2002), The Messenger (2002), and Bridge of Clay (2009) (Grade Saver, 2012).



Genre:
Historical, Fantasy, Mystery, Suspense and Horror


Subgenre:  World War II and the Holocaust, The Occult and Supernatural
 
Curriculum Ties: Ties into lessons on Nazi Germany, the Holocaust, World War II, and conflict.

Booktalking Ideas:

1). What is the importance of the usage of color throughout the book?
2). What does Death mean by saying that he is "haunted by humans?"

3). What do words mean to Liesele?

Reading Level/Interest Age: Lexile Reading Level: 730/YA (Follett's Titlewave, 2012). 

Challenge Issues: This book contains images of war, human cruelty, and violence. I would use the following items to defend this book if it was challenged:

1) Refer to Library Bill of Rights, see items: I, II, and III (http://www.ala.org/advocacy/intfreedom/librarybill).
2) Refer to San Diego Public Library collection policy - (http://www.sandiego.gov/public-library/about-the-library/freedom.shtml).  Original site: The American Library Association (ALA) Freedom to Read/View Statement (http://www.ala.org/offices/oif/statementspols/ftrstatement/freedomreadstatement).
3) Refer to California School Library Association (CSLA), Model School Library Standards - September 2010 (http://www.csla.net/index.php/publications/school-library-standards). PDF: (http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/librarystandards.pdf).
4) Refer t0 American Association for School, Librarians Standards for the 21st Century Learner (http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/guidelinesandstandards/learningstandards/AASL_Learning_Standards_2007.pdf)
5) Contact Office of Intellectual Freedom for any further support, 800-545-2433, ext. 4223 or oif@ala.org.
6) Refer to legitimate book reviews, such as: School Library Journal, Booklist, Kirkus Reviews, Horn Book and others; found on either Academic Search Premier, Follett's TITLEWAVE, or Amazon.com.

Why did you include this book in the titles you selected?:
This book tells a powerful story about a girl struggling to understand what is happening in her life through the use of words, reading, and writing. Liesel's experience through war and describe events that many young adults in the U.S will never experience. I included this book as a means of describing to young adults the negative effects of conflict, war, and violence and the boundless spirit of humans to overcome. 

Reference Page:

 
Follett's Titlewave.  (2012).  The book thief. Retrieved July 21, 2012 from Follett's Titlewave iPhone app.

Grade Saver.  (2012).  The biography of Markus Zusak (1975-).  Retrieved July 21, 2012 from http://www.gradesaver.com/author/markus-zusak/

Random House.  (2012). The author.  Retrieved July 21, 2012 from http://www.randomhouse.com/features/markuszusak/author.html
 

Cover art:
Zusak, M. (2005).  The book thief cover art.  Retrieve July 21, 2012 from http://pancakesandfrenchfries.com/2012/02/the-phenomenally-indecisive-book-club-march-the-book-thief/

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

Gale PowerSearch

Bibliographic Information: Gale PowerSearch. http://www.gale.cengage.com/. Cengage Learning, Inc. 

Plot Summary: Gale PowerSearch is a super search function of the Gale research group. Gale PowerSearch allows users to search over all the different Gale product options, such as: Gale Virtual Reference Library, Science In Context, Biography In Context, and over 35 other products. This option allows users the widest net of information possible. 

Critical Evaluation: N/A

Reader’s Annotation:
Gale PowerSearch is a high powered search option that offers researchers the widest net of information retrieval.
 
Information About the Author: Gale, a part of Cengage learning, is an e-research and publishing service for students, schools, universities, libraries, and a variety of other users (Gale: About, 2012). The Gale company offers over 600 databases that are in print, ebooks, published online, and in microform (Gale: About, 2012). Some of the resources Gale offers are: fulltext magazines, newspapers, and many other services (Gale: About, 2012)

Genre:
Database

Curriculum Ties: Tie into lessons on best research practices and resources.

Booktalking Ideas:
N/A

Reading Level/Interest Age: 15+

Challenge Issues: No issues. If there are any issues, I would use the following items as a defense:

1) Refer to Library Bill of Rights, see items: I, II, and III (http://www.ala.org/advocacy/intfreedom/librarybill).
2) Refer to San Diego Public Library collection policy - (http://www.sandiego.gov/public-library/about-the-library/freedom.shtml).  Original site: The American Library Association (ALA) Freedom to Read/View Statement (http://www.ala.org/offices/oif/statementspols/ftrstatement/freedomreadstatement).
3) Refer to California School Library Association (CSLA), Model School Library Standards - September 2010 (http://www.csla.net/index.php/publications/school-library-standards). PDF: (http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/librarystandards.pdf).
4) Refer t0 American Association for School, Librarians Standards for the 21st Century Learner (http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/guidelinesandstandards/learningstandards/AASL_Learning_Standards_2007.pdf)
5) Contact Office of Intellectual Freedom for any further support, 800-545-2433, ext. 4223 or oif@ala.org.
6) Refer to legitimate book reviews, such as: School Library Journal, Booklist, Kirkus Reviews, Horn Book and others; found on either Academic Search Premier, Follett's TITLEWAVE, or Amazon.com.

Why did you include this database in the titles you selected?:
This subscription database is a great option for schools and libraries because it teaches students, especially high school aged students, what reliable information sources and materials look like.

Reference Page:


Gale. (2012). About. Retrieved July 21, 2012 from http://www.gale.cengage.com/about/

JSTOR

Bibliographic Information: JSTOR. http://www.jstor.org/. ITHAKA.

Plot Summary:
JSTOR, a subscription based not-for-profit service, is designed to provide trusted scholarly content (i.e research articles, primary sources, and books) to students, researchers, and librarians (JSTOR: About, 2012). JSTOR can be accessed for free through your local library by simply using your library card.

Critical Evaluation: N/A

Reader’s Annotation:
JSTOR, a non-profit service, offers a variety of people the reliable scholarly content they need.
 
Information About the Database: JSTOR was originally created to help libraries cut down on the cost of building a digital library (JSTOR: Factsheet, 2012). In 2009, JSTOR merged with ithaka. org (JSTOR: Factsheet, 2012). JSTOR has access to over 1400 scholarly journals, will soon be offering books, and is dedicated to preservation and high quality digitization ((JSTOR: Factsheet, 2012).

JSTOR also has an incredible reach and impact on many institutions
(JSTOR: Factsheet, 2012). JSTOR reaches over 7,000 institutions in 150 countries, 990 secondary schools, 132 libraries in about 32 countries (JSTOR: Factsheet, 2012). JSTOR prides itself in providing access to reputable scholarly journals, primary sources, and soon, books (JSTOR: Factsheet, 2012).

Genre:
Database

Curriculum Ties: Could tie into a lesson on best practice research methods and techniques.

Booktalking Ideas:
N/A

Reading Level/Interest Age: 15 +

Challenge Issues: No challenges. I will present the following listed materials if any issues do arise.

1) Refer to Library Bill of Rights, see items: I, II, and III (http://www.ala.org/advocacy/intfreedom/librarybill).
2) Refer to San Diego Public Library collection policy - (http://www.sandiego.gov/public-library/about-the-library/freedom.shtml).  Original site: The American Library Association (ALA) Freedom to Read/View Statement (http://www.ala.org/offices/oif/statementspols/ftrstatement/freedomreadstatement).
3) Refer to California School Library Association (CSLA), Model School Library Standards - September 2010 (http://www.csla.net/index.php/publications/school-library-standards). PDF: (http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/librarystandards.pdf).
4) Refer t0 American Association for School, Librarians Standards for the 21st Century Learner (http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/guidelinesandstandards/learningstandards/AASL_Learning_Standards_2007.pdf)
5) Contact Office of Intellectual Freedom for any further support, 800-545-2433, ext. 4223 or oif@ala.org.
6) Refer to legitimate book reviews, such as: School Library Journal, Booklist, Kirkus Reviews, Horn Book and others; found on either Academic Search Premier, Follett's TITLEWAVE, or Amazon.com.

Why did you include this database in the titles you selected?:
I chose this resources because it offers teens another legitimate resource for high quality research materials, such as: scholarly journals, primary sources, and books. These are all important factors of a strong researcher and scholar.

Reference Page:
 


JSTOR.  (2012).  JSTOR: About.  Retrieved July 17, 2012 http://about.jstor.org/about-us

JSTOR.  (2012).  JSTOR cover art. Retrieved July 17, 2012 from http://www.the-digital-reader.com/2011/01/12/jstor-to-add-ebooks-in-2012/#.UAdYbpHAHyI

JSTOR.  (2012).  JSTOR: Factsheet.  Retrieved July 17, 2012 from http://about.jstor.org/sites/default/files/jstor-factsheet-20120213.pdf